Biomedical Engineering Department Senior Design Teams

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Team 1

Mikayla Garcia



Patrick Hocking


Fawaz Mohsin




Faculty Advisor(s)

Patrick Kumavor, PhD.

Sponsor

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findbettr Social Resources App

A one-stop web platform for discovering and accessing social resources to increase utilization and improve population outcomes.

Find Better, with findbettr.

Digitilization is core to the success of any organization in the 21st century. Very quickly with a given search of any social resource (i.e. housing, daycare, etc.), it becomes apparent that many local resources for low-income communities have no online footprint. This makes it difficult for a significant proportion of the population to access or even hear about these resources, and many are missing out on core services that could improve quality of life. The findbettr web platform was designed to quickly enable community members to more easily access resources in a straightforward, optimized way.

The findbettr platform has two core functions aimed at being a one-stop shop for community resources. The first, a proprietary matching algorithm that filters and scores a person's demographic and needs assessment against local resources, triages and displays only the resources that a person is applicable for in order of their needs scoring. The second, the quickfind function, allows for metatag-based searching, with users accessing broader categories such as healthcare or education needs, or searching all resources relative to a specific demographic (a more brute-force approach). In both cases, users can view custom account pages with descriptions, contact information, and more.

 

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Team 2

Margaret Daniel
Samuel Dailey
Jessica Tang



Faculty Advisor(s)

Dr. Patrick Kumavor

Sponsor

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Prosthetic Leg for Dancers

Prosthetics have come a long way since their largely cosmetic beginnings. Now, they are able to give independence back to amputees by performing basic skills required for activities of daily living. However, prosthetics for specialized functions are rare, especially for something as intricate as dance. The current state of the art dance leg prosthetic lacks the adequate mechanisms to allow a performer to change her stance. The products which can change the angle of the ankle are expensive and their complexity creates the possibility for more things to break. The goal of our project is to create a simple lightweight below the knee prosthetic leg for dancers with the capability to change foot stance. Our design works to combine art and science to develop a low cost, high function lower limb prosthesis to put amputee dancers back on stage.

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Team 4

Ounssa Akhayar
Nicholas Tauken
Teagan Driscoll



Faculty Advisor(s)

Patrick Kumavor

Sponsor

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Mechanical Human Thorax Model for Automatic and CPR Device Testing

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is an emergency lifesaving procedure that is performed on patients whose hearts have stopped beating until medical personnel arrives on the scene. If the quality of CPR is poor, the patient may not survive cardiac arrest. These subpar skills could be caused by a variety of reasons; most commonly either inadequate execution of the procedure or rescuer fatigue. A mechanical CPR device can eliminate and avoid these problems and can be applied to sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). In order to test the CPR device for success and train individuals on CPR, a prototype that simulates a human thorax and chest is necessary.  To make this possible, a mechanical human thorax model that easily allows for benchtop testing of automatic and mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) devices that treat cardiac arrest for Defibtech, LLC must be constructed. It is known that the human thorax has both elastic and viscous features, so the design model should replicate both features with a high degree of accuracy and efficiency. To improve market success and the overall user quality, the new design added pneumatic dampers to the springs that create the element of nonlinearity. It also included mechanical, electrical, and software components. The mechanical component focused on recreating the mechanical characteristics of the chest. The electrical component included sensors to collect data on the forces acting on the chest model and its displacement from the rest position during CPR. And the software component entailed programming a microcontroller for use as a feedback system to automatically control the damping coefficient of the pneumatic piston so as to obtain the desired hysteresis. Sensors were also integrated into the system to collect force and displacement data. This provided feedback on the chest compressions and information for a feedback system that could change the damping coefficient in real-time. 

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Team 6

Abhishek Singla
Liam Connelly
Zachary Newman
Gregory Austin


Faculty Advisor(s)

Guoan Zheng

Sponsor

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Develop a Scanning Platform for Digital Pathology

The development of a digital pathology scanning platform based on the original problem statement needs to be enhanced, as additional features and methods will be required to create a final product. The first area of improvement necessary is the use of lensless camera technology. Instead of using a traditional microscope with multiple objective lenses, a lensless camera will be used to streamline the overall design. This will simplify the technology needed for imaging, as the camera will be able to capture the slide with any desired level of precision along with an increased level of detail. Another revision to the original description is the inclusion of image processing to rapidly identify tissues and any abnormalities. Using the processed images will allow for better clinical application, as doctors can rapidly distinguish any issues in a slide sample. Additionally, the platform will be constructed from an inexpensive CNC or similar machine that allows for automated movement of a slide in an x or y direction on a small platform. Lastly, a mobile app could be developed to accompany the platform and imaging system to create a seamless transition from viewing the slides to the digital reproduction. Overall, a more cost effective digital pathology scanning platform will be designed and created from an affordable CNC or related machine that includes on-board lensless imaging, imaging processing and analysis, and a possible easy-to-use mobile application.   

 

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Team 7

Michael Guth
Denica Creighton




Faculty Advisor(s)

Guoan Zheng

Sponsor

Inexpensive LAMP Reaction Device

The goal of this project was to develop a low cost alternative to traditional PCR machines, which cost several thousand dollars on the market. The PCR process as a means to amplify target DNA or RNA sequences is vital to disease testing (such as COVID-19) and in school settings when studying biological sciences. By providing a low cost and portable alternative to standard PCR machines, this project has the potential to increase access to disease testing in developing nations and can be used in underfunded school environments. This project utilizes Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification, which unlike traditional PCR only utilizes one temperature and can run reactions in thirty minutes. Using colorimetric reagents, allows for a user to see their test results without any extra equipment. This is extremely critical in diseases testing, when getting results to a patient without needing a lab-technician provides greater access in developing nations. Each LAMP unit costs just under $250, and a each rapid COVID-19 test costs $7.86. These low price points help to increase access to consumer home testing, as well as public health departments to disperse testing materials. The device can run 12 tests every 30 minutes and does not require any advanced knowledge to operate. This project has helped to remove the monetary barrier of research, testing, and education in DNA and RNA amplification.

 

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Team 8

Nathan Brockbank
Mariam Mohsin




Faculty Advisor(s)

Dr. Sabato Santaniello

Sponsor

EEG-based Sleep Apnea Detection

Obstructive sleep apnea is a sleep disrupting condition impacting up to 7% of adult men and 5% of adult women which is linked to the exacerbation of several severe health conditions including cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer's disease, and stroke. Current detection methods, most importantly overnight polysomnography, are invasive and time demanding of sleep specialists. This leads to long waiting lists for screenings and decreased rates of diagnosis. The purpose of this study is to design a minimally invasive method for the automatic detection of obstructive sleep apnea using a computational machine learning pipeline which uses features computed from EEG data obtained from overnight PSG studies available on Physionet. This computational method will enable at-home diagnosis and reduce the labor and equipment involved in moderate to severe OSA diagnosis. The energies of EEG frequency bands and interband energy ratios are promising features to use in a classifier for the detection of OSA. Application of Random Forest Classifier provides a satisfactory accuracy of 75% but poorer than expected precision and recall. The classifier results show a tendency of the algorithm to detect most windows as non-apnea meaning the true-positive rate for detecting an actual apnea event is lower than expected. Future refinements aim to improve precision and provide better detection of apnea events to give patients better awareness of their sleep patterns and recommend treatment as needed.

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Team 9

Cydney-Alexis De La Rosa
Thomas Cotton




Faculty Advisor(s)

Sabato Santaniello

Sponsor

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Smart Insole for Freezing of Gait Suppression

The objective of this project is to design, prototype,  and test a smart insole to detect FOG and provide relief for patients affected by Parkinson’s disease, as well as to analyze the walking cycle to detect and suppress the Freezing of Gait (FOG) episodes before impacting a patient’s quality of life. The insole is  composed of PLA base with a top layer of  EVA material. Two FlexiForce A201 force-sensitive resistors sensors (FSRs) are positioned underneath the insole, specifically in the forefoot and heel areas. The computational unit, which analyzes the gate in realt time and detects FOG, is secured to the ankle with a velcro adjustable elastic strap. Upon detection of FOG, the unit will activate an audio cue to aid the patient overcoming freezing. This design improves upon state of the art alternatives seeing as it is discrete, light-weight, and uses event-triggered sound cues for the most efficient correction of FOG symptoms. Lastly, the additional EVA layer serves to shock absorb any harsh force thus providing patients with maximum comfort.  

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Team 10

Alexander Stiefel
Collin Johnston
Zachary Flanagan



Faculty Advisor(s)

Sabato Santaniello

Sponsor

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Arm Exoskeleton for Restoring Wrist and Elbow Control for Patients with Stroke

Every year, more than 795,000 people have a stroke, which may result in paralysis or weakness in about 80% or patients. The purpose of this project is to create a wearable exoskeleton for the upper extremities of an individual who is suffering paralysis or loss of movement due to a stroke. The team has created a complete orthotic casket for the actuation of the forearm, wrist, and elbow through the process of additive manufacturing. This was accomplished by 3-D printing, and mechanically testing a wearable orthotic, including motors, that can flex the forearm, wrist, and elbow of a patient recovering from a stroke. The device includes an exoskeleton combined with actuators to control the flexion and extension of the wrist and elbow, along with the supination and pronation of the arm. These combined movements provide for 4 total degrees of freedom. The design also includes an optimized wearable holder to carry the batteries and microcontroller. The device is designed to allow the adjustment of the torques with minimal intervention by having interchangeable gears with varying gear ratios. The benefit of this is it allows for the customization of the orthotic for different types of patients with different needs, and it is amenable to combine and integrate adaptive control strategies in the future.

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Team 11

Aiden Riley
Haya Jarad
Gabriela Tirado-Mansilla



Faculty Advisor(s)

Dr. Feng

Sponsor

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3D Reconstruction of Sensory Neurons and Their Axons in the Dorsal Root Ganglion

Chronic pain is a debilitating condition that often relies on prescribing powerful opioids for treatment. These pain signals travel through a group of sensory nerves in the Dorsal Root Ganglion (DRG) located adjacent to the spinal cord. While electrical stimulation of the spinal cord has been proposed as an alternative treatment for chronic pain, the DRG is a recent and more promising target for chronic pain management since it can reach a wider range and is more effective in decreasing pain. Our project was an investigation of these sensory nerves responsible for the transmission of pain signals in the DRG, with the goal of improving current approaches to DRG stimulation. Our group took three different approaches towards this goal that included optical clearing and confocal imaging of harvest murine DRG, 3D modeling of DRG-housing vertebral sections for finite element analysis, and computational modeling of the sensory nerves’ response to stimulation. The combination of these three processes will eventually allow for the construction of a morphologically-accurate 3D computational model of these nerves that can be used to investigate novel approaches for pain management. 

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Team 12

Sandeepkumar Sasidharan
Rishi Chaddha
Ryan Trocki



Faculty Advisor(s)

Patrick Kumavor

Sponsor

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An alternative method of designing accurate pulse oximeters for Covid-19 patients

The purpose of this study is to observe pulse oximeters of different price ranges and to test the accuracy between commercial oximeters and FDA-approved ones; to provide an adequate recommendation for the patient. From this information, it can influence a potential design that can be used to make a pulse oximeter that is cheaper and that is able to record information for the duration of the incubation period of COVID-19. Most pulse oximeters in the market had inaccuracies greater than the manufacturer claim (>4%). To overcome the accuracy of most pulse oximeters we plan on using a hospital-grade device as the standard for testing. We will feel comfortable giving a recommendation to a commercialized product that falls within or below 2-3% accuracy of the actual reading and if the commercial product is just as comparable to that of a hospital-grade device. This recommendation should allow for infected patients or potentially infected patients with a way to monitor the progression of the disease and identify potential severe episodes before they can occur. Allowing patients, the ability to seek proper medical care early.

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Team 13

Corben Braun
Charles Li
Abdul Younis
Austin Mott


Faculty Advisor(s)

Dr. Yazeed Maghaydah

Sponsor

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Clinical Prone Positioning Bed to Help ARDS and COVID-19 Afflicted Patients

We are busy working on a solution that can drastically increase the number of recoveries as well as the rate of recovery with the method of pronation. Our solution can pronate patients at a quicker rate, without it being at the cost to the safety, health, and transmission to staff.  

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Team 14

Evan D'Agostino
Catriana Hershey
Adriana LaMarca
Kaleb Sicina


Faculty Advisor(s)

Kazunori Hoshino

Sponsor

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In Vitro Model for Traumatic Brain Injury

This project aimed to continue developments an in vitro model for traumatic brain injury (TBI). Specifically, the group changed designs to the hammer and hammer components, designed a new release mechanism to allow for repeatable and consistent impact forces, and made progress on developing an ANSYS model to provide for a deeper understanding of the mechanics of impact. Additionally, the group researched and utilized a new cell dye for imaging the neural cells and tested the use of dissociated cells. Changes to the design of the apparatus were tested and verified using dry runs conducted with a sponge and wet runs conducted with neural tissue cultured in a scaffold. The different tests allowed for imaging of the impact through camera images and calculation of the force using force measurements. The new cell dye was verified by using hydrogen peroxide to induce apoptosis in 2-D cell cultures before testing with the 3-D. From the data collected, it was shown that the improvements made in this project were valid and made progress towards developing a more realistic in vitro testing device, though there is more work that must be completed in order to fully optimize the model. The requirement for this design is to develop an in vitro model to simulate traumatic brain injuries. The model should allow for further study of the effect of TBI on neurons in hopes of developing better preventative methods and treatments for TBIs. Improvement to the current model will include a more repeatable application of force on the cells, that is in the range similar to TBIs. The model should also be modified to allow for improved cell growth. Additionally, cell culture and imaging techniques will be refined allowing verification of axon network formation prior to the TBI and quantification of damage to cells post TBI.   

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Team 15

Andrea Hemberger
Tom Philipson
Colleen Ross
Anand Vaish


Faculty Advisor(s)

Kazunori Hoshino

Sponsor

Mechanical Characterization of 3D Microtissues

The mechanical properties of a tissue are important biomarkers of its health, but the size of the microtissues limit their ability to be mechanically characterized using current testing methods. So, our goal is to prepare and test 3D microtissues (0.1-2 mm) for high-throughput biomechanical analysis (well-plate and petri dish compatible). We approached this with a two-part design.
The first part of the design entails the staging of the sample. This is done by creating different PDMS stamps. Each stamp is designed for a specific sample in mind, and then the stamp is used to stamp agarose treated well plates. Proper manipulations and mechanical testing requires the sample to be stable and remain in a consistent location, for more accurate measurements.
The second part of the design was optimization of cantilever beams for different samples, based on stiffness. By changing the thickness, width and length, the stiffness of the beam was altered to the respective stiffness of the sample being tested, which results in more effective and accurate mechanical characterization.
This design will be applicable to many different microtissue samples, but our focus is on the successful staging, and testing of tumor spheroids, tumor organoids, as well as embryonic tissues.
 

 

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Team 16

Heather Brown
Kristin Rheault
Morgan Neydorff
Will Pawshuk


Faculty Advisor(s)

Dr. Kazunori Hoshino

Sponsor

Design of Smart Shunt System

Hydrocephalus is a neurological condition where cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) accumulates in the ventricles of the brain which can lead to death if left untreated. Typically, hydrocephalus is treated using a ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt, which drains excess fluid from the ventricles to the peritoneal cavity where the fluid can be properly absorbed. VP shunts are currently monitored for malfunctions using invasive, in-comprehensive, and expensive screening methods; however, only 50% of individuals screened have a shunt malfunction. Thus, a new method is needed to quickly and accurately monitor shunt functionality to prevent individuals from undergoing unnecessary screenings. In this project, a novel smart shunt system was developed to measure the flow rate of CSF to monitor shunt functionality. The design utilizes a reflective polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) cantilever beam coupled with an optical detection system. Using infrared communication, the flow rate measurement is wirelessly transmitted through the skin to an external receiver. The external receiver can be connected to a bluetooth device to relay sensor readings to both the patient and physician. The results recorded from lab testing demonstrate that an implantable flow sensor is feasible for monitoring ventriculoperitoneal shunts. This implantable flow sensor can serve as a practical, quick, and less expensive method to monitor VP shunt malfunctions.

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Team 17

Allison Murphy
Sarah Alfarag
Stefani Chiarelli
Abigail Phillips


Faculty Advisor(s)

Krystyna Gielo-Perczak

Sponsor

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Project Management of Stress of Patients under Compression of Hologic Paddle Designs for 3Dimensions™ Mammography System

Breast cancer is a disease that affects approximately 1 in 8 women in their lifetime (13%). Additionally, 1 in 39 women will die from breast cancer. Unfortunately, at the time when a tumor is small and easily treated, breast cancer does not have any obvious symptoms. This is why regular screening is important in order for early detection and treatment. The best way to detect breast cancer in its early stages is through a procedure called a mammogram. However, it was found that 88% of women experienced pain during their mammograms, and this experienced pain stops women from attending mammograms in the future. The goal of this project is to determine ways to examine and quantify the psychological stress felt by women during mammograms. This will minimize the discomfort and anxiety felt by women during the procedure, encouraging them to obtain regular mammograms. A detailed survey will be administered during the study in addition to electrocardiogram (ECG) measurements, electrodermal activity (EDA)/galvanic skin response.  Originally, this study was intended to provide Hologic with comparative data between their Hologic SmartCurve paddle and the conventional paddle. Not only would this data demonstrate the differences between the two paddles, but it would also provide feedback on other aspects of the procedure that can be further investigated and developed to decrease the patients’ stress. Depending on the results of the study, these statistics would be used to promote their product and warrant the replacement of the conventional paddles with their own SmartCurve paddles. As one of the largest producers of mammogram machines, this company has a lot of influence in the mammography field. However, due to timeline restrictions created by IRB approval and other various difficulties, Hologic’s SmartCurve paddle was not actually used to compress the breast. Instead, data collected during a quiet standing position was compared to data collected during a position mimicking a mammogram.  

 

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Team 18

Sharanya Ganesh
Zinnia Hall
Mitchell Modarelli



Faculty Advisor(s)

Krystyna Gielo-Perczak

Sponsor

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Multi-Systems Approach in Evaluation of Leg Exoskeleton with Application of Modeling and Simulation

Lower-extremity exoskeletons provide patients the ability to regain motor control and muscle mass. Current exoskeleton designs provide powered assistance via actuators: heavy and expensive, yet necessary mechanical components that contribute to limited portability and accessibility of the device to the general population. The purpose of this study is to quantify the assistive ability of a lower-extremity exoskeleton design in aiding the sit-to-stand motion. Performance is measured by multiple testing systems synchronously gathering balance, muscle activation, and motion capture data. Readings from the AMTI AccuSway force platform and Delsys Trigno EMG sensors, alongside OptiTrack motion capture recordings, are used to generate C3D files of several dynamic trials of a subject performing the motion without provided assistance. The AnyBody Modeling System is used to optimize the locations of the subject’s joint axes, joint centers, and segment lengths as gauged by the motion capture system to generate kinematic joint angle data, ultimately providing a more accurate and subject-specific model.  Subsequently, incorporating the synchronous muscle activity and force data enables an inverse dynamic analysis to be conducted, by which joint reaction forces and moments are calculated. Repeating the procedure with the subject actively wearing the exoskeleton allows for the device’s influence on these joint reactions, and thus the physical demand to surrounding muscles, to be quantitatively determined. A successful design will provide stability to a patient’s knees while assisting the patient in regaining muscular strength and motor control.

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Team 19

Jonell Hobert
Gregory Cherry
Matthew McCormick



Faculty Advisor(s)

Krystyna Gielo-Perczak

Sponsor

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Human-User Interaction with Different Robotic/Exoskeletons Leg Rehabilitation Devices

Our project focuses on the advancement of current leg rehabilitation techniques and technologies.  Rehabilitation devices are used to reinforce the ligaments, tendons, muscles, and bones of the knee.  During rehabilitation a patient's knee is very susceptible to reinjury therefore creating a device that accounts for the safety of the patient is a top priority.  While developing the new device it's important to consider the amount of discomfort the patient is experiencing while wearing it.  When the body experiences discomfort it is then translated into a stress response that alters the way the body communicates with itself which ultimately impacts whether the knee is able to heal properly.  Research has shown that many patients have difficulty with the 'sit-to-stand' motion in particular.  Therefore the goal of this device is to be able to track the patient's response, adapt to their recovery speed, be lightweight, easy to assemble, and low cost all the while being as pain-free as possible.  Creating a device that patients can use both at the hospital for physical rehabilitation as well as at home, will allow the patient to maintain their sense of normalcy and independence.  This is especially important for senior patients as the psychological toll of constantly requiring assistance can change the way their body responds, hindering the effectiveness of their recovery.       

 

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Team 20

Gregg Salomon
Colt Nichols
Gavin Fennell
Dipesh Bhatt


Faculty Advisor(s)

Dr. Patrick D. Kumavor

Sponsor

Student Sponsored

UV-C Active Filtration Device (PPE) for Inactivation of Viruses

With Covid-19 becoming a worldwide pandemic and future threats in the form of harmful biological agents, there is a need for active filtration that inactivates/sterilizes air that does not currently exist.  Current technology does not provide the 99.999% inactivation/sterilization of virus/bacteria required to prevent spread of disease. Our student-run senior design project focused on developing an active UV-C light filter for use in PPE such as a personal protective mask for use by medical professionals and the public which meets or exceeds this threshold.  This internal UV-C filter provides the optimal wavelength for inactivation of virus particles in a manner which provides the required UV dosage and airflow to achieve this rate while maintaining the breathability and comfort for prolonged usage, especially by healthcare professionals who are subject to significant exposure to airborne viral load for extensive durations.  Design parameters also allow for active use for a significantly longer duration than that seen by the competition among the relatively new UV-C mask filter technology.  Finally, our unique design achieves this goal in a relatively simplistic design to minimize the technical challenge of production and assemble through the use of a simple subunit which can be easily expanded to meet a required increase in overall exposure or a decrease in power requirement.  With the tremendous impact that Covid-19 has had on all of our lives, we hope that targeting a significant and immediate need with a technical solution provides future relief to humankind.

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Team 21

Emily Shea
Shayan Sasani
Trevon Graham
Jennifer Aguilar
Jillian Strandberg

Faculty Advisor(s)

Bin Feng

Sponsor

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UV-Vis Spectroscopy for Local Tissue Perfusion Detection in the Advancement of Minimally Invasive Surgery

Minimally invasive surgery is a growing branch of the medical field, concerned with operations that lead to decreased trauma to the body. Laparoscopy for example, uses one or more small incision to allow surgical instruments to access the body with the least amount of damage to the tissue. Minimally invasive surgery is a growing field due to its many advantages in comparison with open surgery. It decreases the patient's risk for infection, increases healing rates, physically there is less bleeding and less scarring, and this is all followed by less hospital time. An important component of surgical procedures is the perfusion of biological tissue. Tissue perfusion can be defined as local blood flow through a capillary bed within a tissue. It has been found that good local tissue perfusion helps the success rate and healing of a surgical procedure. This project aims to find a way to quantify local perfusion of tissue. In doing so, the goal is that tissues can be identified as well-perfused or ill-perfused, which would help a surgeon determine the ideal location for incisions. Perfusion can be quantified by the oxygenation of the blood (more specifically the hemoglobin) in a tissue. The overall goal of this project is to evaluate a state-of-the-art perfusion detection method and complete a proof-of-concept study demonstrating the application of UV-Vis Fiber Optic Spectrometry for local tissue perfusion.

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Team 22

Amit Eshed
Ngoc Luu




Faculty Advisor(s)

Dr. Thanh Nguyen

Sponsor

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Skin Regeneration on Piezoelectric Polylactic Acid Scaffold

This project was aimed to investigate piezoelectric Polylactic Acid (PLLA) as a biomaterial for skin regeneration, which is translational to clinical therapies to treat chronic wounds in burn patients. Piezoelectric PLLA is fabricated as a fibrous scaffold using electrospinning techniques. The scaffold needs to be characterized to determine its suitability to support cell growth and tissue regeneration. The scaffold also needs to demonstrate via its piezoelectric properties enhancement of cell viability and cell adhesion in order to be effective for chronic wound healing applications. For the purpose of facilitating the wound healing process particularly for 3rd-degree burns, newly seeded fibroblasts cells must be capable of surviving on the surface of the scaffold. For the proper formation of the extracellular matrix (ECM) to support the regenerating cells, cells must be able to grow stably on the scaffold.

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Team 23

Sidney Chemini
Ashley Nelson
Amelia Picard



Faculty Advisor(s)

Dr. Krystyna Gielo-Perczak

Sponsor

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Evaluation of Shoulder Rehabilitation Devices for Post-Operative Rotator Cuff Repair

The aim of this project was two-fold: 1.) Develop and implement a biofeedback procedure within a rotator cuff rehabilitation regimen to quantify shoulder rehabilitation progression, and; 2.) Design and validate a biomechanical shoulder rehabilitation device to aid in the transition from an in-office to remote physical therapy modality due to the altering conditions created by the COVID-19 pandemic. To accomplish these aims, literary research was conducted to formulate an experimental rehabilitation procedure. To confirm that the procedure could be safely performed, human models were created using AnyBody Modeling System™ Software to simulate the desired procedure. This procedure consisted of biomechanical testing of two devices, the SLIDe™ Device and the TableTop Device. The SLIDe™ Device was originally designed by a previous senior design team and the TableTop  Device was constructed as a redesigned, more compact version of the original SLIDe™ Device design. EMG sensors were placed on the Infraspinatus, Teres Major, Deltoid, Biceps Brachii, and Triceps Brachii, to obtain raw muscle activity data. This data was analyzed, and Root Mean Square (RMS) values were extrapolated to determine which device produced the optimal level of rehabilitation within the bounds of the project. This testing validated the TableTop design as a smaller and more portable version of the original design, capable of assisting in rotator cuff rehabilitation, and confirmed that this was the optimal design suited to fulfill the second aim of the project.

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Team 25

Rachel Thompson
Ajitha Chivukula
Ayushi Agrawal
Katrina Cirilli


Faculty Advisor(s)

Dr. Krystyna Gielo-Perczak

Sponsor

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Measurements of Stress of Patients under Compression of Hologic Paddle Designs for 3Dimensions™ Mammography System

The purpose of this project is to quantitatively assess the physiological responses expressed by a patient while receiving a simulated mammogram using Hologic’s 3Dimensions Mammography System. This project is a continuation of last year’s efforts to determine if differences in paddle designs have a significant effect on the comfort experienced by the subject. This is an IRB-approved study collecting data from 25 participants to analyze the stress differences between the standard of care (a flat paddle) and the SmartCurve paddle supplied by Hologic Inc. Our group focused on the electromyography (EMG) and balance control data measured during the study as indicators of physiological stress.   

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Team 26

David Pierson
Katrina Charitonuk




Faculty Advisor(s)

Krystyna Gielo-Perczak

Sponsor

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Multi-Systems Approach in Evaluation of Leg Exoskeleton

The purpose of this study is to develop a user friendly lower-extremity exoskeleton that will assist in the sit-to-stand motion. The device will be easy to put on, biocompatible, lightweight, and affordable. Sufficient function of the exoskeleton will assist in regaining motor control and muscle mass in order to provide long term solutions to muscle atrophy or neural degeneration. The device has the ability to provide knee stability during appropriate motions as well as analyze body kinesthetics in order to provide real-time assistive forces and moments. The exoskeleton, in its assistive nature, will additionally grant the user full control of their initiated actions at all times, and will not forcefully counteract a user-intended movement to return to a seated position or straighten the leg if a user is falling over. This feature is key to the user’s confidence in implementing the device into their daily life. Alongside its ease and comfort of use, adaptability and user-friendliness are effectively prioritized. Success of the exoskeleton design is quantified by the extent of its ability to assist a patient in regaining motor control in performing the sit-to-stand motion. In order to gauge whether the exoskeleton is successful in these regards, synchronous tests are performed using multiple systems. This quantitative evaluation occurs when the three pieces of hardware generate data for the various software components. The AMTI AccuSway force platform measures the weight and force the patient places on it, the OptiTrack Motion Capture cameras use marker oriented tracking to determine locations of body parts in a three dimensional space, and the Delsys Trigno electromyography sensors analyzes muscle usage. These input data into the computer system and the data gets recorded and instantly transformed into a live reading of the patient’s current activity, allowing for the evaluation of the device both quantitatively and qualitatively and ultimately improved upon.

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